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 Posted: 07-03-2020 06:35 pm
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jensendriver123
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Hello,

I recently purchased a 1974 JH and am having a very difficult time finding any diagrams/pictures of the engine systems. In particular, I'm trying to diagnose a very slow coolant leak that appears to be coming from the back of the water pump. I'm thinking I my have to pull the pump and replace the gasket. But, I'd like to be able to see images of the parts so that I can visualize what I'll be getting into and what I'll need. I've got the shop manual but it's very difficult to get a clear feeling of what all is needed, just from reading words. Thanks very much.

Richard

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 Posted: 07-03-2020 09:03 pm
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redracer
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the shop manuals are written almost as an afterthought, and unless they had been required, would likely not have been made(the 4 speed tm. and the differential section aren't too bad).
The underside of the water pump has a "weep" hole, and any fluid coming out from there will mean the pump needs rebuilding.
Spray some "electrical cleaner"(CRC is readily available): around the area, and start the car and look for exactly where it is coming from(hopefully not the head gasket.0
Keep us posted

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 Posted: 07-03-2020 10:28 pm
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discogodfather
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Here is a nice bookmarked pdf copy of the service manual:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/y930pzxifz6o7vk/Manual%20-%20Workshop%20-%20Jensen%20Healey%20%281%29.pdf?dl=0

Last edited on 07-03-2020 10:32 pm by discogodfather

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 Posted: 07-03-2020 11:11 pm
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redracer
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This is a '73 wiring diagram as the fuel pump "hot" wire(W-91) is still a white wire(means ignition switched, unfused) instead of the later harnesses, where the fuel pump is a green(means fused) wire from the middle/#2 fuse. I have yet to see an up to date diagram(having rolled out four different harnesses from all the cars I used to have) showing this.
However, this will at least get you "started" along a useful path--we'll try to help after that!

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 Posted: 07-04-2020 01:45 am
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jensendriver123
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Redracer, Did you mean to post a link in your last post by chance? I haven't been able to get under the car yet because it has a front spoiler on it. But, I did get a hydraulic jack and stands, today. So, should be able to get under it once I figure out what jack points I can use. Should I be able to see what I need to see from under the car? Do I need to pull the timing belt cover off to be able to see what I need to see? I really can't see much at all as is.

Thanks very much.

Richard

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 Posted: 07-04-2020 02:31 am
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jensendriver123
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Redracer, I can see, under the front of the car, there is a structural member that runs from one wheel to the other with a heavy flat piece of steal welded on the bottom. Looks like that is a good place to place the floor jack. But, in the back, I don't see anything that looks like an obviously safe place to place the jack without damaging anything. Can I put the jack right under the differential? Or should I jack the car, one side at a time, along the "sill" right in front of the rear tires?

Thank you.

Richard

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 Posted: 07-04-2020 03:34 am
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discogodfather
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Jacking the healey can be troubling. The front subframe (big metal plate) at a central point is good, on the rear I always use the bottom of the pumkin. When you jack or support it from one side in the rear at the control arm pickup points to the body, it bends the body. If you open the doors up while its suspended from those rear suspension points, at least on my 73, it is difficult to open the door.

I usually put jack stands at the point at which the rear control arms meet the axle. This is a no go for rear suspension work as it keeps the rear suspension compressed but other than that its good.

Front jack stands I put at the pivot point at which the lower control arms come into the subframe. This gives good clearance to work on the engine, exhaust, etc. It doesn't compress the front suspension so you can do any work to it you need to.

I stay away from any points on the body in terms of jacking or jacks in general. It just bends and moves too much.

Last edited on 07-04-2020 03:34 am by discogodfather

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 Posted: 07-04-2020 01:58 pm
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redracer
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Use the points Disco mentioned; you can also put the jack stands: FRONT: at the foremost point where the long rails double up with the front frame; REAR: again, where the same long runner doubles up with trailing arm support.
However, do NOT jack up the car at these points but use the front subframe and the rear pumpkin as Disco said

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 Posted: 07-04-2020 05:25 pm
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Esprit2
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The Workshop Manual is not overly burdened with illustrations. Some, but not enough that you can get a clear mental image of everything before you dive in.

Follow the link Disco posted, and download a copy of the manual. Then go to:

Section A Covers the Engine

A13 - "Remove the Water Pump", Pg 6,
...and...
A49 - "Install the Water Pump", Pg 22-23, includes how to rebuild the water pump.

Just an FYI...
In A49, Step 3 says to press the pulley hub onto the shaft to "the fitting dimension of 3.875 inch (98.4mm)". That's important in order to keep the pulley's V-groove in the same plane as the groove in the crankshafts V-belt pulley. However, the dimension is from the rear face of the housing (the surface that touches the block) to the forward face of the hub; and that is not easy to measure while the pump in the press having the hub pushed on. As an alternative, I use a stack of feeler gauge leaves to measure the gap between the hub's back face and the front end of the pump housing's nose. Then when pushing the hub on, place the stack of leaves on the housing's nose, and press the hub on until it makes contact. Write that number down for future reference... like, buy a manual, and write the new 'hub to nose' dimension in A49, Step 3, on pg 22. Or on the Illustration on pg 23.

Regards,
Tim Engel

Last edited on 07-04-2020 05:27 pm by Esprit2

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 Posted: 07-06-2020 03:57 pm
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jensendriver123
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Thank you, everybody, for the helpful information. I'll try to give that a try tonight.

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 Posted: 07-07-2020 02:52 am
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jensendriver123
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Ok. I got it jacked up and finally could look under it. Doesn't look too bad. Right wheel is a little loose. When my wife wiggles it I can see the rotor moving slightly, from under the car. So, maybe that is where the shimmy is coming from. Need to get in there and see if I can find what's loose. Otherwise, I have new tires that I'll put on and get it aligned and see if that improves the handling. Transmission is missing the rubber grommet that seals the fork access through the bell housing. Otherwise, the steering linkage and balljoint, rubber boots all look good. No dried hard rubber. I'm wondering if the shimmy could be coming from a loose joint somewhere, but not sure how to detect that. Engine and subframe is "generally" greasy but not too bad. It's not at all obvious where the leak is coming from. So, first thing, I'm going to make an appointment, at my local European car mechanic, to steam clean the engine and under carriage. Then, hopefully, after a little bit of driving, I'll be able to see where the leak is coming from as well as any oil seepage that needs to be taken care of. The transmission does bump pretty hard if I don't slip the clutch enough (doesn't take more than a little slipping, maybe up to 2500 rpm). But, interestingly, sometimes it works fine without any slipping. So, it's definitely not consistent. I don't think it has to do with "warming up" since it seems to happen pretty randomly. I did see what looked like one missing bolt in the bell housing.

Ok. The journey begins. Thanks so much for everybody's input.

Richard

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 Posted: 07-07-2020 08:09 am
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discogodfather
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The wheel bearing is easy to adjust, there is a small dust cover and it comes off to reveal a castle nut with a cotter pin through it. Remove that, and then be sure there is enough grease in there. Screw the nut back in until it's tight.

Now the wheel will not turn anymore. Screw the nut out by 25 degrees in increments until it goes to a light drag and then spins freely, put the cotter pin and castle nut back in place, you are set. It's described this way in the factory service manual as well.

The transmission rubber grommet it available on ebay and from Delta for about $15. It's worth it to keep garbage out of there.

Drain the tranny fluid and replace it with half 90 weight GL4 gear oil (avoid GL5) and half Lucas Oil stabilizer. The Lucas stuff is basically a 110 weight oil with lots of zinc in it, should help on old boxes that are fussy.

When you steam clean, disconnect the battery and don't reconnect it until after it's dry. Wrapping the distributor, alternator, and carbs in a ziploc bag is also very helpful as water can get in and make things difficult to start later on. Stuff some shop towels in the carb bores if they airbox isn't tight (or missing) or cracked.

If there is consistent clutch slipping and the rubber gater is gone on the bellhousing, try and take a mirror with a flashlight and see if that oil leak didn't contaminate the clutch. If it did, steam clean the clutch. I had a small rear main leak and it did get some oil in there, and I steamed it out and practically everything came out. Just make sure it's completely dry before taking off. Other than that it could just be a worn clutch.

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 Posted: 07-17-2020 03:23 am
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jensendriver123
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Hi Guys, So, I got the engine all cleaned and the car inspected. Turns out I've got a pretty serious gas leak which was causing the engine to die at idle speeds. So, now I'm into rebuilding or upgrading the carbs. I'm wondering what folks think about rebuilding the Strombergs vs going with the Dellortos. I haven't been able to find too much discussion on the forum except for one thread where someone indicated that the Dellortos do give better response since it's a direct mechanical connection to the jets. Is it a "drop in" replacement or is it one of those things where I then have to think about possibly swapping out the cams? It sounds like the 107 cam can drop in with the stock springs.

I've got the carbs and manifold off now so that I can see the valves. The intake walls are all covered in black and the valves also. But, it looks like a thin coating. I'm wondering, at this point, whether I should even consider pulling the head and getting it "serviced". I haven't been able to locate the source of the leak I was referring to earlier in this thread. I don't see any indication that the leak is coming from the water pump. So, maybe it's coming from the head gasket but I can't locate it and now I can't run the car to try to see it.

I'm wondering if folks can recommend what I "might as well" do now that I'm into it this deep. I'm also thinking of replacing the distributor with the JHSP lucas and pointless system. Basically, I want to do the things that will make the car as reliable as possible so that I don't have to rip it apart again 6 months or a year down the road.

Thanks very much for everybody's help.

Last edited on 07-17-2020 03:33 am by jensendriver123

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 Posted: 07-17-2020 05:53 am
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Tom Bradley
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The coolant leak could also be from the hose that goes to the intake manifold. Since you have the manifold off, it would be a relatively easy time to replace this. The short hose to the intake elbow is also hard to replace and gets neglected. There could be a crack in this or a loose clamp. I also have had trouble with coolant leaking from the thermostat housing seal. Nowadays I have to use a gasket as well as silicone sealer to get a reliable seal here. The threads on the water pump housing are just soft aluminum, so over-tightening the bolts and stripping the threads is fairly easy to do, making the top overly loose. Putting helicoils here may be necessary if somebody with more muscles than brains (like me sometimes) has ever worked on it.

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 Posted: 07-17-2020 02:26 pm
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redracer
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Richard: rebuilding the Strombergs is fairly simple(there are a few tricks, such as coating/using teflon tape for the bottom choke screw so gas doesn't leak put there) and I would recommend that for any engine under 9.5:1 compression. The Dellortos/webers are a waste of expensive carbs and if you travel over mountainous places, will run too rich, whereas the Stombergs(and SUs) are constant depression and will not need adjusting.
From what I've read so far about your car, you would be well advised to take it to someone with extensive knowledge to determine what may really need fixing/replacing/etc. so you don't waste time & money.
keep us posted, bruce

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 Posted: 07-17-2020 03:46 pm
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jensendriver123
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Bruce,

It sounds like you might be saying that it's not even worth the money to get the JHPS Stromberg rebuilds? Just get the rebuild kit and do it myself? All their claims about "high standards" and "high quality" ... is overhyped?

You have convinced me to stay with the Strombergs, in any case. I do live in the mountains and the engine is stock. So, thanks very much for saving me a bundle of money there, as well as the hassle of having to deal with more maintenance/adjustment issues.

I did take it to a "specialist" highly rated eurocar shop (the only place in Reno that works on such cars) and they wanted to charge me $1000 just to rebuild the carbs, which they said needed done, among a bunch of other stuff that brought the bill to over $6k. That was too much to stomach. So, I got the car towed back home to dig into it myself.

I'm going to get a compression tester and leak down tester. Maybe, if the leak is from the head gasket, the leak down test will reveal it. But, would it not be unusual/unlikely for a head gasket to be bad at 48K miles, or would that still be possible after 45 years of age? (Tom, yeah, I checked all those hoses and they all seemed tight. I'm going to replace them all anyway.)

What are your guys' thoughts about swapping out the distributor with a JHPS rebuilt with Pertronix pointless version? Or, are their claims overstated?

Ok. Thanks again for all your help.

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 Posted: 07-17-2020 04:27 pm
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redracer
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wow--1000 smackaroos! It usually takes me 5-6 hours to rebuild both(have done well over 150 pairs/sets) and at $72/h, that would be under $500 including the kits!
Yes, you could rebuild them yourself, but there are a few tips you should know before you start.
You're welcome to email me directly, RedRacerbm@gmail.com or call---404-261-2552, or for real time video SKYPE( I'm RockClimber52 )

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