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Stromberg Rebuild Question  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: 04-25-2010 11:00 pm
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Steve Jarvis
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A leak on the bottom of one carb prompted me start to rebuild the carbs on my '73. I have the kit and most of it looks fairly straight forward.

When I first got the car both carbs were filled with a "green gooey substance" from sitting for 10 years. Not sure what caused this but cleaning was difficult. Most of it came out but the jets and needles took a beating. I thought new ones were the way to go.

I am puzzled about how the main jet is removed and replaced? It appears they are pressed in to the carb. Ideas on how to switch the old for the new would be great.

Thanks in advance.

Last edited on 04-25-2010 11:00 pm by Steve Jarvis

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 Posted: 04-28-2010 02:29 pm
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Brett Gibson JH5 20497
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Steve, it's not common practice to replace the pressed in main, it can be done but I haven't seen  much written on the subject. As for the gunk, thats what happens to old gas left in carb's, just make sure you get it all out and all the holes are clear of it.

Try running new needle's and see how the carbs respond, and dont forget to check how much accellarator shaft play you have, the seals dry up and allow air into the barrell.

Brett

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 Posted: 05-01-2010 03:50 pm
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Arvin Appelman
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The main jets are pressed in and care should be taken if you plan to replace them.  Before removing the old, measure the the set back from the throat.  It is probably about 0.100".  Use a manual arbor press for removal and installing the jets. I had a tool made for pressing the main and a spacer made the same thickness as the setback so I could press the main up to the spacer.  This helps eliminate the guess work.  The tool is made to put the press force on the shoulder of the jet rather that the end.  When pressing the new jets in, remove the piston and metering rod.  You will see a flat in the the throat where the main jet enters.  Get a metal rod about  the same size as the piston, insert it through the piston opening and tip the unit upside down.  Put the spacer in the opening for the main jet so it lays on the end of the rod and press the new main to it.  The rod allows  you to use the spacer and supports the carb housing when pressing the jet in.

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 Posted: 05-04-2010 01:45 am
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Steve Jarvis
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Arvin, the idea of making a stop for pressing the jets in was a good suggestion. I had noticed the difference and was wondering how to limit how far the jet was pressed in. Suspect this will save considerable aggravation.

Do you suggest any heat on the sleeve that holds the jet before pressing out the old jet?

 

Last edited on 05-04-2010 01:49 am by Steve Jarvis

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 Posted: 05-04-2010 01:47 am
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Steve Jarvis
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Brett, appreciate the advice and suggestions. The needle may do it but the jet is quite beat up. Given the accuracy they make the needle, I suspect a small difference in the size of the hole in the jet will throw the fuel mixture way off.

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 Posted: 05-05-2010 12:22 am
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Greg Fletcher
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The jet orifice dimension is very specific. As the metering needle is biased, it will wear the orifice into an oval shape over the years and make the Strombergs run so rich as to be no longer adjustable. As mentioned, the problem with replacing them is getting the non-adjustable jet back to the correct height since they are pressed in way too tight to begin with- it's a completely stupid design to meet emission laws of the time. Earlier versions of the Stromberg 175 CD seen in the Volvo were adjustable as they were threaded and could easily be serviced.

Having done this before, my first inclination would be to throw the bodies away and try and find an earlier version or at least something in better shape. If a 2 ton press cannot push the jet into the exact position you need them to be in, then the carbs will never run correctly as a result. You can try and take off some material from the body or the new jet, but you will need to be careful to leave enough for a snug fit.

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