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Steve Duncan
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Does anyone have a diagram of the engine's lubrication system?

Esprit2
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Here is the overall Lubrication Schematic.

Regards,
Tim Engel

Attachment: 9XX Oil System Flow Diagram - 97kb.jpg (Downloaded 152 times)

Esprit2
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And here's a closer look at the Oil Pump Flow Schematic.
Both illustrations are from Lotus manuals, but also apply to Jensen-Healey.

Regards,
Tim Engel

Attachment: 9XX Oil System Pump Flow Diagram.jpg (Downloaded 148 times)

Last edited on 09-23-2019 02:03 am by Esprit2

Esprit2
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Oil Pump and Auxiliary Housing Exploded Parts Drawing.

This drawing is for the 910S Turbo engine, but it's the same with the exception that the ChargeCooler (intercooler) coolant pump goes where the distributor used to be. The ignition was distributorless/ crank-triggered.

Regards,
Tim Engel

Attachment: 9XX Oil Pump Parts Exploded Diagram.jpg (Downloaded 148 times)

Last edited on 04-14-2020 04:29 pm by Esprit2

Esprit2
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Oil Pump Exploded Parts Drawing.

Regards,
Tim Engel

Attachment: 9XX Lubrication - Oil Pump, Pres Relief Valve - Parts, Exploded Drwg - All 9XX.jpg (Downloaded 147 times)

Last edited on 09-23-2019 02:32 am by Esprit2

Esprit2
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Location of the Air Bleed Hole in the Auxiliary Housing. It's important to reducing the amount of time required for oil pressure to build-up during an engine start. If your engine takes an inordinate amount of time to build pressure, then check this hole and make certain it hasn't become plugged by sludge.

Very early 907s didn't have an Air Bleed Hole... it was added as a running change. If yours escaped the TSB update, then this is where to drill a 1.4 mm (0.55") diameter hole. Do so with the Auxiliary Housing off the engine, and completely flush any metal chips from the housing prior to re-installing it.

Regards,
Tim Engel

Attachment: 907 Oil Pump, Aux Housing Mod - Air Bleed Hole Location - illustration.jpg (Downloaded 145 times)

Last edited on 04-14-2020 04:31 pm by Esprit2

Esprit2
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And in real life...

Regards,
Tim Engel

Attachment: 907 Oil Pump, Aux Housing Mod - Air Bleed Hole Location - photo.jpg (Downloaded 145 times)

Esprit2
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Maybe a little out of sequence, but finally, here's the Oil Pressure Relief Valve components.

Regards,
Tim Engel

Attachment: 9XX Lubrication - Oil Pump, Pres Relief Valve - Parts, Lotus X-Sect Drwg 4 - Color.jpg (Downloaded 143 times)

Last edited on 09-23-2019 02:33 am by Esprit2

Steve Duncan
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Exactly what I was seeking. Thank you very much.

redracer
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TIM: once again, thanks for taking the time to post the pix: I always wondered why they didn't run the pick-up tube oil through the filter BEFORE sending it out to the cooler? Many have added or replace the filter with the add-on over were the original air filter went, a much better configuration.
Any thoughts?
bruce

Esprit2
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Bruce,

I think, but don't 'know'... that the oil flow was designed to work correctly with just the pump... no oil cooler. Then, when an oil cooler sandwich plate is added in, the flow becomes oil cooler first, then filter. I don't think that was a plan as much as a result of adding a cooler after the engine was designed.

I do like a conversion to a vertical filter orientation... regardless of where it is placed. That makes filter access easier from below the car (especially with a K&N filter with the 'hex nut' feature on its end), and minimizes the oil spill mess whenever the used filter is removed.

The easiest approach involves using a Ford 90 degree adaptor on the engine. I believe Ford used more than one 90 degree adaptor, but I know that the one from a 1994 4.0L V-6 SUV engine, or from a Ford Ranger works). Adapters can be found in the $20 to $40 range on e-Bay or junk yards.

Cast in markings on the adaptor:
Ford
C9J1A
89TM6884AA

Summit Racing lists a 'Ford' 90 degree adaptor with 3/4-16 threads, but it looks a little different. I've not tried it, but I see no reason why it shouldn't work.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/FMS-M-6880-A50/

The aftermarket remote filter kits also work well, if there's enough room somewhere in the engine bay to place one. Regardless of what is used, installation will require some creativity and mechanical skill... or pay a pro to do it.

Regards,
Tim Engel

Matthew10571
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Tim: 
I have 2 aux. housing and neither of them have this hole drilled.  Do I drill it through the housing as it is showed, into the big open area on the other side.  Does it effect oil pressure in general besides quicker oil pickup? 

Last edited on 04-14-2020 02:50 pm by Matthew10571

Esprit2
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Yes, drill through. A shallow, blind hole that goes nowhere would do nothing.

If the oil pump and the rest of the system is in good working condition, including the correct oil viscosity choice, then the small hole won't have a significant negative effect on either pressure or flow rate. But the hole will help to shorten the time required to build oil pressure during engine start-up.

Regards,
Tim Engel

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I am using a 20w-50 motorcycle type oil with zinc.

SimonD
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Just got her out of her winter slumber and have noticed that the oil pump pulley has moved back against the oil pump housing. Would anyone one know why this might be, and how I should rectify it?

Attachment: 1.jpg (Downloaded 72 times)

discogodfather
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SimonD wrote:
Just got her out of her winter slumber and have noticed that the oil pump pulley has moved back against the oil pump housing. Would anyone one know why this might be, and how I should rectify it?

It could be related to your tensioner setup. Does it have the older curved style pulley (with twin bearings) or a newer flat design? They typically go bad in the bearings and also the pulley can wear so out of true it causes issues.

Verifying correct belt tension is a good idea as well.

Even after converting to a newer style my setup pushes the belt in that exact same location towards the opposite direction. It's no big deal as long as it doesn't come off the wheel at all and has solid engagement.

How does the belt track on your cam pulleys? Is the dizzy wheel rubbing against the housing?

Last edited on 04-15-2020 04:30 am by discogodfather

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I thought this might be a good thread to ask- been thinking about adding an accusump (oil accumulator). Most of the literature on these says to put it on the return line from oil cooler (with a check valve highly recommended). Seems like this would be pushing oil into the filter, then into the engine.

Is this the best location? I also see how the oil pressure sender "plate" might be a good location, although it's a small opening. That hits the mains directly through the main oil galley correct?

redracer
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Likely the sprocket does NOT have the chamfer on the back to "capure" the steel ring. Aftermarket cam sprockets had been made WITHOUT this chamfer, so as you tightened the allen bolt, the sprocket would push the steel ring out of its groove.
You will need to remove the belt and sprocket(use a gear puller; don't Bang on it with a hammer).
If it does not have achmfer, or much of one to "capture" the steel ring, have it machined to do so.
bruce

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The auxiliary pulley should be installed with Loctite to secure it.

The little wire circlip that serves as an abutment for the pulley is not very strong, and is easily overcome. Torquing the pulley's retaining bolt is like trying to clamp something securely against a marshmallow. Even if you do manage to tighten the pulley in place, you can't count on it remaining secure long term.

A little medium strength blue Threadlocker will suffice. Rub a little on the shaft, avoiding the keyway, and wipe most off. Leave just a little to ensure that the surface is fully wetted out/ rubbed in... ie, it's 'primed'. Then apply a more liberal smear of Loctite in the pulley bore, again avoiding the keyway.

This way, when the pulley is pushed on, the majority of the excess Loctite will be pushed out the front of the bore where it can be easily wiped off (don't let any get into the bolt hole). The little bit that does ooze out on the back side of the pulley should also be thoroughly wiped off. What you DO NOT WANT is any excess Loctite migrating to the lip seal that is right behind the pulley, where the shaft enters the auxiliary housing.

Next time the pulley comes off, heat will be required to kill the Loctite. In order to protect the lip seal from torch flame or heat gun, first wrap a wet rag around the shaft between the pulley and seal, covering the face of the seal. Then apply the torch/ heat gun from behind the pulley, aiming forward at the hub. All excess flame/ heat blast goes forward, NOT back at the seal.

Getting back to the job on hand...
Install a small (3") 3-jaw puller on the pulley. Have the jaws installed so the hooks face inward. Slip the jaws through the 'spoke holes' and directly grab the hub. Obviously, on older pulleys with solid center webs, you'll have no choice other than to grab the outside rim. But the pulley is aluminum, and pulling too hard on the rim can result in the spokes or center web cracking/ breaking. If your pulley has spoke holes, take advantage of the opportunity to pull directly on the hub.

DO NOT run the puller's jack-screw directly against the end of the auxiliary shaft, or you risk messing up the threaded hole, and you'll never get the bolt started again. After removing the large, thick washer, either replace the bolt, or place a "little smaller than shaft-sized", 1/4" drive socket between the end of the shaft and the jack-screw... ie, give the jack-screw something other than the shaft to bear against.

Start by cranking the puller up fairly tight, but not in 'full puller mode'... don't go all "Mongo" on it. Then apply heat to the hub. As it gets hot (~235 F) watch the joint line between the shaft and pulley bore. When you see a little bubbling there, the Loctite is soft/ boiling, so you can get serious with the puller.

The two cam sprockets and the crank sprocket should be installed with Anti-Seize in their bores, NOT Loctite. They have large shoulders to bear against, so properly torqued, they won't loosen up. Only the auxiliary pulley gets blue, medium strength Loctite.

Define "Mongo".
In the movie "Blazing Saddles", Mongo was the big dumb guy (played by Alex Karras) who dropped a horse with one punch. "Mongo strong like bull !!". Mongo also not too bright. Don't go all Mongo with the puller on the aluminum sprocket.

Regards,
Tim Engel

Last edited on 04-20-2020 07:16 pm by Esprit2

Esprit2
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SimonD wrote:
Just got her out of her winter slumber and have noticed that the oil pump pulley has moved back against the oil pump housing.Carefully inspect the lip seal that is flush with the end of the auxiliary housing. If the pulley has been rubbing against it, it may very well be damaged.

Regards,
Tim Engel

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I've had two 907s develop a problem with "ignition scatter". Put a strobe timing light on it, and the ignition timing could be seen jumping all over the place. Careful examination showed that neither the distributor nor the electronic ignition pick-up were the cause... so what was?

I decided to dig in deeper, and remove the auxiliary housing for a more thorough 'bench' examination. But when I pulled the auxiliary pulley off, I noticed that the keyway in the bore had been 'hogged' out to about 3/4" (19mm) wide. The Woodruf key is shorter than the bore is long, so both ends looked normal. But look inside the bore, and the damage was obvious.

Even when an engine appears to be running smoothly, the power comes in pulses. In a 4-cylinder, two pulses per revolution. The pulley hadn't been mounted with Loctite. And even though the bolt had been torqued to spec, the pulley eventually over-rode the wimpy little wire circlip, releasing all the clamp load. It was loose on the shaft, and the pulsing power delivery had worked the Woodruf key back and forth in the bore enough to 'machine' a wide grove. The pulley & shaft wobbling back and forth relative to one another... and to the crank... is what was causing the ignition scatter.

I've killed two pulleys that way, mounting both without Loctite. Sometimes I can have a rather flat learning curve, but this lesson eventually sunk in. Don't forget the Loctite.

Regards,
Tim Engel

Last edited on 04-20-2020 05:28 pm by Esprit2

SimonD
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Thank you all for the very informative replies. I have taken it apart and the little spring between the distributor and the shaft is missing, so nothing to keep the shaft forward.
Now need to find a suitable spring.

Attachment: 1.jpg (Downloaded 44 times)

redracer
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Simon: if you can't find one locally, I have some :used: ones. As long as we're on the subject of woodruff keys wallowing out their sprocket slots, my experiences are somewhat different from Tim's.
Although I have never had the oil pump/distributor sprocket push past the spring washer(except for some Dave Bean aftermarket ones in the '80s; one side was chamfered and the other side flat, unlike the OEM Lotus ones; ALWAYS test torque before putting the belt on), the steel crank pulley is held "in place" by the friction of the thick washer using the 50+ psi from the main bolt. HOWEVER, if you ever remove this nut & washer, you will notice the washer has been "pulled" in by the force of the bolt, and should be turned around, reflattened, or replaced, or I guarantee you will ruin your sprocket '
best wishes, bruce

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Speaking of oil returns, is there any function to the holes surrounding the head studs? I removed the old head studs, waiting on an ARP kit from Greg. I cleaned them as best I could and then started to realize- to these holes drain oil back into the pan at some point? Are they closed off at the bottom?

mtechwim
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Good topic

Found out that from my oil pump the outer ring was broken in 2

But a fast replacement from Kees fixed te problem I hope.

Last edited on 04-30-2020 04:05 pm by mtechwim

PF18602
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Disco,

I'm not sure why the diameter of the stud hole is that much bigger than the stud itself (maybe for some heat transfer or expansion so it doesn't crack the block?). But I do know that the hole for each stud just bottoms out. Mine were all filled with some impressive 40 years of gunk.

And of course from all those heat/cooling cycles, I ended up having to weld the nuts onto each stud to get the damn things out!
I ended up cleaning the threads with simple green and a pipe-cleaner type brush. Also used the old stud to chase the threads on a couple, as the ARP studs didn't want to go in easily.

Patrick

Last edited on 04-30-2020 04:53 pm by PF18602



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