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 Posted: 08-12-2015 04:38 pm
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gmgiltd
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Has anyone ever looked up "automotive handling " in Wikipedia and read the somewhat slanderous comments about the Jensen GT.?
It would appear that the author has missed out on the delightful handling of the 304 AMC Gremlin of the same era.

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 Posted: 08-13-2015 04:28 am
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NigelK
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Slanderous perhaps, factually incorrect definitely! Has anyone ever seen a GT (or Healey for that matter) with an aluminium exhaust manifold? It would be interesting to see copies of the Motor magazine and Road & Track road tests referred to in the Wikipedia text - perhaps there were fair comments from motoring journos at the time that the GT had lost some of the fun factor because of increased weight and an increasingly emissions strangled engine. But it seems a big stretch to mention the GT in the same bracket as the Corvair. And to not give the MGC a mention!

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 Posted: 12-21-2018 04:21 pm
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noomg
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I've never even heard of an aluminum exhaust manifold before on anything. Isn't the melting point of aluminum something like 980 degrees and isn't the typical exhaust temp around 1200 to 1500 degrees?
Who knows who writes these after the fact road tests, there are a lot of bogus articles written by people who just base their opinions on old road tests and have never actually driven the cars they are writing about. I remember one of these articles on the TR7 that stated the big problem with them was the rear axle would fall out of the car. Not only have I never heard of this happening, I don't of anyone else who's reported this "problem". If you want to learn about your car it's probably best to read the original road tests.
As I recall Road&Track was rather harsh on the J-H, as they were on a lot of other cars. They said "the rear end looks like a Spitfire while the front end doesn't look like much of anything" (eye of the beholder).

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 Posted: 12-21-2018 09:19 pm
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allstateguy
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Pontiac had aluminum exhaust manifolds available for the SD engines in their lightweight Super Stock full sized cars back in 1962. I think they were considered practical only in drag race situations.

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 Posted: 12-22-2018 03:02 pm
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noomg
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You learn something new everyday. I'm guessing those manifolds wouldn't have been a good choice for the 24hrs of LeMans.

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 Posted: 12-22-2018 04:50 pm
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Tom Bradley
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one of these articles on the TR7 that stated the big problem with them was the rear axle would fall out of the car

I don't know about the TR7, but TR4's and TR6's definitely had a problem with the rear ends falling off with very little warning. I almost had this happen on my TR4 except that I happened to be going slowly at the time and pulled over as soon as it started making clunking noises. A friend of mine with a TR6 was not so lucky. It did not happen when the car was new, only after 50K miles or so when things started wearing out and coming loose. So I would not be surprised if the TR7 had the same issue.

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 Posted: 12-22-2018 06:56 pm
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noomg
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If TR4s and TR6s had that problem I could see that since those two cars have the same bones. The TR7, however is a completely different car and shares nothing with it's numerical predecessors. The TR7, like the Jensen-Healey, has a four link trailing arm rear suspension so a lot of things would have to break in order for that to happen. I'm not saying it didn't happen just that I've never heard of it.

What's really interesting is the TR7 seems to have a lot more in common with the Jensen-Healey than it does with it's predecessors, such as; rear suspension, unibody, ohc 4cyl.

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