Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register

 Moderated by: Greg Fletcher
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Rustorama  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: 07-15-2009 03:48 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1st Post
jdenglish
Member
 

Joined: 02-11-2009
Location:  
Posts: 78
Status: 
Offline
Group,
I got off lucky in the trunk, just some pitting. Flushed with success I crawled under the car and got a real shock. The floorboards were rusted all the way through. Thick open cell foam carpet pad and carpet did their job.  I know I've got to cut it out, but the rust seriously penetrated the longitudinal box beams.  I think the undercoating may be all that's holding it together.  I scoured the list but couldn't find a related article.  Is there re-bar and epoxy in my future?
Thanks,
John

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: 07-15-2009 03:57 pm
  PM Quote Reply
2nd Post
JodyKerr
Member


Joined: 05-15-2006
Location: Tempe, Arizona USA
Posts: 217
Status: 
Offline
John,

What you're describing is a common problem. I've got to do the same thing with my blue Jensen Healey when I work on it. Jim @ Delta has the necessary weld in replacement planels for the floorboards and the seat supports.

When you say longitudinal supports, are you referring to the two "beams" that run front to back on the chassis underneath the floorboards? I'm not certain if those are available anywhere. From what I've seen in the past, generally those are salvageable with a fair bit of cleaning.

The welding itself is pretty straightforward if you know how to weld.

Post pictures for more commentary.

Jody

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: 07-15-2009 04:05 pm
  PM Quote Reply
3rd Post
jdenglish
Member
 

Joined: 02-11-2009
Location:  
Posts: 78
Status: 
Offline
I'll give Jeff a call this morning.  It is in fact the ones that run front to back. My theory on the box beam literally would be 1/2" epoxy coated rebar placed inside and an injection of colloidal exoxy to fill the voids.  I'll post some pictures after the autopsy has been completed

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: 07-16-2009 01:45 am
  PM Quote Reply
4th Post
Jensen Healey
Super Moderator


Joined: 03-11-2005
Location: San Anselmo, California USA
Posts: 977
Status: 
Offline
LOL! That's the first time I've heard of re-bar used in car repair!  Why not build a concrete beam? And don't forget the lally columns.

Seriously, just have your local sheetmetal shop bend some galv 16ga into a hat channel and weld or rivet it in place? I covered the bent up originals that some moron had been using for jacking points.

Kurt

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: 07-16-2009 08:31 pm
  PM Quote Reply
5th Post
Judson Manning
Member


Joined: 03-14-2005
Location: Atlanta, Georgia USA
Posts: 406
Status: 
Offline
Rebar and Angle Iron...

My similar story is continuously welding two 3/4"x3/4"x1/8" pieces of angle iron down the "frame rails" to tie the front and rear suspension pick-up points together.  Add in a little plate steel and 13492's undercarriage is ready for battle.  Sheet metal finished out the floorboards.

Of course this is overkill, but i was motivated to go to such extremes after i noticed the passanger footwell was bowed up about 3" after a few laps at Talladega.  Before then I really didn't know a monocoque could twist like that!

 

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: 07-17-2009 10:46 pm
  PM Quote Reply
6th Post
LambandAndy
Member


Joined: 10-21-2005
Location: Eastanollee, Georgia USA
Posts: 72
Status: 
Offline
Attached is an excert from an from an article I wrote for the JHPS magazine some time back.

It might give you some pointers (perhaps on how not to do it).

Andy

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: 07-18-2009 02:17 pm
  PM Quote Reply
7th Post
LambandAndy
Member


Joined: 10-21-2005
Location: Eastanollee, Georgia USA
Posts: 72
Status: 
Offline
Seems like the attachment was too big.  Send me your email address (to limey01@aol.com) and I'll send it to you.

Andy

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: 07-21-2009 05:40 pm
  PM Quote Reply
8th Post
jdenglish
Member
 

Joined: 02-11-2009
Location:  
Posts: 78
Status: 
Offline
I just received my replacement floor pans and seat rails from Delta.  Since there is virtually nothing left of the front to rear floor rail stiffener on either side, I'm wondering just where to cut particularly at the rear suspension attachments and not risk misaligning the whole thing. What materials to use to make the new stiffener.  I presume the replacement would be welded in place first and the floor pan welded to it. Spot welded or continuous?  How to keep the thing from rusting out again from underneath ?  What to put on the topsides..Dynamat, Ethefoam?
Thanks
John

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: 12-04-2009 02:13 am
  PM Quote Reply
9th Post
jdenglish
Member
 

Joined: 02-11-2009
Location:  
Posts: 78
Status: 
Offline
The process started by making an exoskeleton of rectangular steel tubing that was welded to the outside rails to stabilize the monoque when thefloor pans were removed.
Floor pan were cut and spot welded in place.  I extended a piece of heavy gauged rectangular stee tubing between the sub frames.  Under coating reapplied and soon the old lump will be reinserted.  Had the great luck the use of a frame lift during the process.  Kids, don't try this at home!  Still have scabs from learning how to weld.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: 03-25-2010 03:26 pm
  PM Quote Reply
10th Post
chiromaster
Member
 

Joined: 03-22-2010
Location: Phoenix, Arizona USA
Posts: 37
Status: 
Offline
I am in the same rusty boat. Any updates on the process and progress? Any pictures

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: 03-25-2010 08:21 pm
  PM Quote Reply
11th Post
jdenglish
Member
 

Joined: 02-11-2009
Location:  
Posts: 78
Status: 
Offline
The project was just completed last week.  The Delta pans were for model years 72-74 and since mine is a 75 they required a lot of hand fitting.  The small pneumatic body saw at Harbor Freight ($19.95) was invaluable.  It cut the panels like a hot knife through butter.  Used a couple of tubes of 3M body seam sealer, undercoated with 3M Body Schutz, sprayed the inside with "Lizard Skin" ceramic coating and over that applied Fat Mat - similar to Dynamat and then the Delta carpet kit. After wiring was completed everything worked but the fuel gauge.  It was started and ran great although it has a very load induction growl below 3000 rpm.  I use past tense because my Conversion Components NZ clutch release bearing failed after 30 minutes........I'm trying to summon the courage to take it all apart again.  I was not a careful documentor but I do have some pictures.  I'll try and put them together and burn a CD. Leave me your contact information at jdenglish@comcast.net

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

Current time is 11:35 pm  
> Jensen Healey & Jensen GT Tech > Engine & Transmission > Rustorama Top




UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2011 Data 1 Systems