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To restore or part out? Need suggestions.  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: 05-14-2005 04:19 am
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themagicalswitch
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Well I have been excited to start this project as I traded my last JH for this and some money. I knew this car was rough from the outside, there is rust all over, and a nice hole all the way through the hood. Any how got started disassembling tonight, took the door off and seat out. Pulled up the carpet and this is what I found under it. (See attached Pictures) I am just not sure whether to jump into this or not. Is this typical rust for a 74? It almost looks like carpet rather than rust. There are also holes rusted through the "frame"

Should I restore this or am I just going to be wasting too much time and money. If so I'll part this one out and find a little better starting point.



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 Posted: 05-14-2005 02:36 pm
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SportsRodder
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It can be done. You would have to do a complete disassembly and beed blast.  Many panels would have to be replaced especially the hood and possibly the fenders if rusted through.  It all depends on your skills, dedication and money. I would run like the wind.

P.S. You have a parts car now find a JH worth restoring!

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 Posted: 05-14-2005 03:56 pm
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Mark Rosenbaum
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Based on the photos, your car doesn't look all that much worse than mine at the time I bought it.  My sills were in good shape, though, as were the fore-and-aft 'frame rails' under the floor.  Replacement floors and sills are available, but IMHO if the frame rails are gone, the car is unrepairable except possibly by a professional restorer.

Assuming the frame is okay, however, the car appears from the photos to be restorable provided you have the time, the space, the tools, the dedication, and the money.  If you have prior commitments on any of these, I'd second the suggestion to find another car.  Otherwise, if you're willing to spend 4 hours every weekend getting rust flakes in your eyes, you should have a body shell ready for paint in 6 months to a year.

Whichever way you decide, have fun.

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 Posted: 05-14-2005 05:16 pm
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Mitch Ware
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Doesn't look any worse than the car I bought. I have the luxury of a body shop at my disposal, so that made it cheaper and quicker to do.

What do you want, a car you can driver right now, or a project that you want to bring back to life and be proud of the hard work you put into it? I'd say it depends on whether or not you are willing to do the job for the enjoyment of doing it. If it is purely a money issue, there look to be some good cars in the marketplace that would be cheaper to buy and drive.

 Mitch Ware

1974 Jensen Healey JH5 #111119670

1971 Triumph TR6 #CC66950LO

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 Posted: 05-14-2005 06:29 pm
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themagicalswitch
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thanks for the replies everybody. Some good points were brought up. As for what I want out of this car- basically knowledge. I want to learn the proper way to restore a car - I have nothing but time and a thirst for knowledge. I am just concerned that this car isn't proper to learn with if you know what I mean.

I have a limited knowledge of all of this as I am still fairly young (21) but I am ambitious and fairly mechanically inclined. I build Ducati's right now for track and street use in my spare time. The JH is going to be a whole different ball game though.

I'll post up more pictures as I get some more taken apart, but it looks like a go as far as I'm concerned.

Thanks

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 Posted: 05-15-2005 09:18 pm
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Dave
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It looks a lot like mine (now in the evil clutches of the local body shop where it's been for the last six months). Once the big rust is taken care of it's real do-able by someone with some basic skills and some time & patience. Please don't send another whole car to the organ banks!

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 Posted: 05-16-2005 06:29 pm
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Jim Sohl
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SN 11210 was in similar condition when I dissasembled the entire car. I took the parts to redi-strip since one is close. Did I say I bought a mig welder and 'learned' to weld? If your Jensen is in a condition like mine, getting back on the road will take many, Many, MANY hours for refurbishment and getting things back right. I'm having lots of fun, 'just wish I had more of the hours. Face it, its a big job.

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 Posted: 05-17-2005 04:17 am
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themagicalswitch
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Alright, so the majority has spoken and the car is going under the knife.

What is the verdict on the floor board replacements in the club store? Are they worth the cash to have something to basically fit and weld in?

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 Posted: 05-17-2005 12:37 pm
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Brett Gibson JH5 20497
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Yes they are and it will save you a lot of time mucking about trying and fitting an alternative, get yourself a lot of self tapping hex head sheetmetal screws and screw them in place, once they are fitted that way buy yourself a wire feed Mig welder and learn to weld, by the time you paid someone to do it for you you could have probable bought 3  or 4 welders, plus if your only 21 having the welder I'm sure it will see more use over the years.

Good Luck and go for it.

Brett

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 Posted: 05-17-2005 12:53 pm
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Mitch Ware
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Absolutely, Brett is right, get the floors and learn to weld. Bear in mind, the floors will not just drop right in, you will have to trim and fit, trim and fit, etc. to get them in.

To remove the old floors, use a grinder or something similar to get rid of the undercoating and locate the spot welds that will be all around the edges as well as on either side of the longitudinal floor beam. Drill out all of the spot welds. These holes will give you an excellent place to weld the floor back in (at least on the floor beam, working from the bottom. Along the edges of the floor inside the car, drill holes in the new floor pans to weld through.  The tighter you can have the two materials you are welding against each other, the better your welds will be and the less chance you will have of burning through either piece of material.

Mitch Ware

1974 JH-5 #111119670
1971 TR-6 #CC66950LO

 

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 Posted: 05-17-2005 05:59 pm
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Mark Rosenbaum
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The prefab floor panels and seat supports are definitely the best way to go.  To install them, welding is best.  However, if welding isn't an option -- it wasn't for me due to medical concerns -- then consider the current automotive structural adhesives.  I would have used them on my car if I hadn't found a body shop that would do the work and the welding.

As an alternative to the sheet metal screws recommended by others, you might consider using pop rivets instead.  These need to be steel- rather than aluminum-bodied because (a) aluminum in contact with steel eventually decays due to electrolytic action, (b) steel is much stronger, and (c) if welding, steel pop rivets can become part of the weld without contaminating it.

If the pop rivets are to remain in place while the car is driven, do not use 1/8" diameter rivets as these are far too weak for a permanent repair of the floor, even if steel.  The 3/16" diameter size, in steel, is adequate.

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 Posted: 05-17-2005 06:42 pm
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themagicalswitch
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Just my luck, I bought a mig welder and learned to weld this winter to make exhaust systems for my bikes.

Looks like after I get it all stripped down and on a rotisserie, I'll work on those floors.

I think I'll try to document the process, especially things like the floor that I haven't really seen any kind of guide for.

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