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Dakota123
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10628 is back on the road after a couple of weeks of rebuilding the brakes.  Glad I did a complete rebuild (including braided steel flex lines) as virtually everything was a disaster.

Napa has really useful poly-coated steel lines that work much better for bending and flaring at home than the usual hard-as-nails stuff.  It comes in various lengths, pre-flared with fittings.  Because the TR7 calipers are metric and the rest of the system is imperial, I cut one metric end off the Napa part, and re-flared with the proper nut.

Anyway, my question to those who have installed the TR7 calipers (Girling type 16, although mine are Lockheed) is this:  how much pedal travel do you have before the brakes actuate?  On mine, there is a couple of inches of travel before the pedal gets firm.  I can't find the specific message now, but I seem to recall someone saying the same thing, and that this is a result of the larger piston diameter. 

I don't think it is air in the system, as there is no pulling, and they work very well, with short stops.  The travel is not a big problem, it just makes them not as responsive as I was hoping for.

Thanks for any thoughts,

Mike

 

 

Last edited on 04-15-2009 03:29 pm by Dakota123

Judson Manning
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There is a rarely used adjustment screw on the shaft mating the brake booster to the master cylinder.  You may need to back it out a few turns to take out the slack in the pedal.

Frank Schwartz
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OK, forget the TR7...does NAPA have lines that will fit the JH????
Frank

JodyKerr
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Dunno if anyone sells brake lines for the JH. They're pretty simple to fabricate though. I'd check with Delta first, if not Martin Robey.

I doubt you'll find anyone that makes them, but if you can get general length measurements we can find pre-fab line, if not, I've flared them in the past, not too bad to make.

 

Jody

Jensenman
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I DETEST flaring brake lines. To do it properly it must be double flared (a single flare is unsafe at brake pressures and will not do!) and a proper double flaring tool is north of $200.00. The $29.95 tools sold at most parts houses are a PITA to work with, make a crappy flare and generally fail (bend, wear out, etc) very quickly.

Edelmann, Everco and others make brake line adapter nuts which will adapt 3/16" brake line to just about anything. The Edelmann bubble flare to inverted flare adapter is P/N 272330, Everco is 3009B, Weatherhead's number is 1441. That's a much safer alternative to an improperly flared line which could fail just when you need it the most.

On both of my J-H's, the stainless braided lines are the 37 degree AN lines commonly available from Pegasus Racing Supplies, Goodridge etc and are installed with adapters. Delta has the adapters (or at least they did, that's where I got the ones for my street driven car).

Dakota123
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"To do it properly it must be double flared (a single flare is unsafe at brake pressures and will not do!) "

I certainly wasn't suggesting anything different.  Of course it needs to be done correctly.

Mike

Jensenman
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Sorry if it came across that way. I get a little wound up about that situation; I have seen far too many people single flare brake lines and call it good.

I used to work at a forklift dealer, one of the techs wrestled a double flare for an hour and then he said the heck with it, single flared the line and put it together. On his test drive through the shop he hit the brakes, the flare blew apart and he hit a concrete block retaining wall.

 

Dakota123
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No worries -- I buy twice the amount of material I think I need.  That way there is no pressure to use a substandard flare.  If it doesn't look like a factory flare, cut it off and do it again.  Much cheaper than the alternative.  I also do a garage test once everything is back together, whereby I pump the brakes hard 10 times or so, then hold full pedal for a full 45 seconds, check for leaks.   Gives a litle piece of mind before you need the brakes for real.

Cheers,

Mike

Brett Gibson JH5 20497
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Jensenman, my experience with fork lift drivers was that they hit the walls before trying the brakes. :>

When I replaced my brake lines a couple of years ago, I picked up a flareing tool kit from McMaster's, and after doing a few test try's of the double flare, things worked pretty well, (knock wood).

Brett



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