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Front and Rear Suspension Rebuild  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: 01-29-2009 09:22 pm
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subwoofer
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I guess I could, but most of the rubber is already out. I'll have a go at the outer housing with a Dremel sometime during the weekend, I think grinding a track almost through should make it come out after giving it a few whacks with a drift (sideways).

--
Joachim

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 Posted: 02-02-2009 10:26 pm
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subwoofer
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The Dremel approach wasn't too successful, so I resorted to brute force... I think the problems really started right at the beginning, because I didn't grind down the socket I used as a receiver (it didn't quite fit). Once things where crooked, they only got worse.

Anyway, I got the d**n thing out last night, the second one should be easier (getting the tools right from the get-go should help). Tools and resulting wreck of a part follows:



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Joachim

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 Posted: 02-03-2009 04:21 pm
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Jensenman
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When I did my front end, the lower bushings were rusted to the arms, not terribly unusual. This meant I had to remove the rubber (I used a torch to burn it out, nasty stinky!) then used a hacksaw to split the outer sleeve. When I started pressing the bushings in, they immediately began to go in cockeyed, not good. In fact, I had to get another control arm and bushing.

So when I started on round 2, I used a wire brush to thoroughy clean the inside of the bushing hole in the arm. Lubrication was necessary, since regular oil/grease will attack rubber I didn't want to use that. Instead, I lubed the sleeve and the arm hole with silicone dielectric grease which won't attack rubber. Instead of a press (way too easy to apply too much pressure and hard to properly align) I used a short piece of schedule 40 steel pipe as a receiver, I used a threaded cap on that end and drilled a 1/2" hole in the center. I then used a piece of 7/16" 'all thread' (it's the only thing that will fit through the stock lower bushing sleeve) and a couple of really big flat washers to draw the bushing into the arm. This setup is self aligning as long as the pipe is cut dead square. It took some effort but worked well.

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 Posted: 05-17-2009 04:05 pm
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Dakota123
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subwoofer wrote:
Now for todays question: Any tricks for getting the old bushing out of the upper rear mount point (the one on the bell housing)? I was not planning on detaching the drive shaft for this job, but the old bushings seem rather stuck.



I'm sure you solved this by now, but to get these out (with the rear end left in the vehicle, properly supported) I used the technique described by Art:  Used a sawzall to cut off the shell and rubber protruding to the rear, nearly flush with the mounting tab attached to the differential housing.  I then drilled out the rubber and cut the shell in a couple of places 90^ apart or so.  Crushed the shell and popped the mess out.  At least in my case, they came out easily.

I used this technique with the trailing arm bushings and lateral link large bushings as well.  Gave me a bit of a headache from all of the banging away to crush the shells, but really not that bad of a job.  (I love it when my wife says things like "Are you sure that's the way you're supposed to do that?")

Mike

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 Posted: 12-01-2014 12:19 am
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Eric
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I have the upper control arm bushings at the differential removed, using the hacksaw technique. The rear end is still in the car, so access is a bit tight. Can someone elaborate on the details of the homemade press to get the new bushings installed?

Thanks..

Eric

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 Posted: 12-01-2014 01:57 am
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Screenplay
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Hi Eric, I don't have any pics so I'll try to describe it. Also, I'm assuming the new bushing has a metal sleeve around it as the old one did - I used Superpro which has the sleeve but I don't know if they all do. My homemade press involves a piece of threaded metal rod, a large socket, washers and nuts (to thread over the rod). Place the new bushing in front of the hole in the diff, insert the rod through the new bushing, place a washer against the bushing and thread a nut against it. On the diff side place the socket over the rod (larger than the diameter of the bushing) a washer and thread the other nut against it. As you tighten the nuts, one side pushes against the diff housing while on the other side the bushing is pushed through the hole. To make it all easier (assuming again there is a metal sleeve on the new bushing) put the new part in the freezer for 2-3 hours before installing. The cold will shrink the metal and it should go right in.

I changed mine with the rear end out of the car and was able to tap in the freezing cold bushings with a rawhide mallet. There may not be room to do that under the car, but if you do, just be certain to support the differential side with a large socket as you pound.

Best of luck with the project.

Clinton

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 Posted: 12-01-2014 02:31 am
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Screenplay
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After reading that last post I realized I should address what I said about freezing the bushing. At most, the metal will contract slightly but that should facilitate getting it into the hole. "Should go right in" sounds overly optimistic.

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 Posted: 12-01-2014 05:12 am
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Eric
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Clinton,
Thanks for the description. I'm using the Superpro bushings as well. I was going to use a long bolt, but threaded rod sounds easier. Somebody suggested a socket on the pushing side as well, but this seems like the uneven pressure might possibly distort the bushing. Thanks for the freezer tip..I'll let them cool off while I have a few beers!

Eric

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 Posted: 12-01-2014 07:07 am
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Eric,
In this case the long bolt with a washer would probably work as well. I would just make certain that the pressure is distributed over the new bushing evenly. The two socket press is something I keep lying around and comes in handy. Enjoy the beers.
Clinton

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