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Turn Signal mount to steering shaft broken - thoughts on fixing?  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: 03-13-2008 10:29 pm
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StabnSteer
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The other day, my turn signal began rotating around the steering shaft when I tried to apply the blinker. Turns out the plastic-like ring that cinches down onto the shaft broke so that no amount of tightening of the screw will cause the assembly to grip the shaft. I tried a few materials on the crack to see if I could find something to repair it...most plastic-repairers do a kind-of melting of the pieces together, but this material refuses to melt.

Anyone had to make this repair before? I even hoped I could do something like a hose clamp around the thing, but I can't get the clamp to grip evenly around the assembly without getting in the way of operation (or, fun-fun, shorting some of the electric bits!).

Thanks for any thoughts!

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 Posted: 03-14-2008 05:22 am
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edward_davis
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I had this problem with my turn signal lever, too, when I bought my JH.  The solution?  Application of $120 to the problem.  One NOS lever from Delta Motorsports and I was on my way.  As far as I could tell, that was the only way to get the switch fixed.  As an added bonus, my high-beams started to work again, too!

You do have to drill out the pop rivets that hold the old wiper switch to the signal switch, but the new one came with screws and nuts to hold the two switches together.

Sorry I can't be of more help!

Edward

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 Posted: 03-14-2008 05:29 pm
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StabnSteer
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Ah yes - the time-honored money option. :)

The fixit-guy in me recoils at the thought, but I suppose there are times when one must go that route!!

I just wonder what this thing is made of...its almost like bakelite...or ceramic.

I'll just add it to my list of things to do as the weather warms up. The rear bushings are one of the first at this point...

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 Posted: 03-14-2008 07:53 pm
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Scott Robinson
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Speaking of time-honored repair applications...I think it was about 5 years ago when I cured the same problem with a carefully trimmed dose of duct tape. Worth a try versus $120+!

Scott

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 Posted: 03-14-2008 08:32 pm
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edward_davis
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But did it fix your highbeams, too?  I would have liked to go that route, but the internal switch for my highbeams was broken and parts were missing.  I definitely prefer the DIY low-buck solution when possible.

It seems like some kind of epoxy might work, since it would actually build a layer between the pieces.  It might be too brittle, though.  Another thought is superglue, which is basically what we use for sticking fossils together here at the museum.  You might be able to hold it together with some of that; particularly if you can get some of the goopier gel-type cyanoacrylate (that's the "active ingredient" in superglue).

Another thought is that you might be able to use some of those zip-ties that are intended for bundling electrical wires together.  You could cut a groove for it to fit into, so it wouldn't slip off.

Sorry I can't help more.
Edward

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 Posted: 03-14-2008 11:50 pm
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Greg Fletcher
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I think I once saw someone fix this with a hose clamp?

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 Posted: 03-18-2008 07:56 pm
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kerna
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I managed to fix it on mine by making up a metal clip to hold the broken bits together.  If yours has broken in the same place as mine it is not difficult to do - you just need to remove the assembly from the steering column to template.

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 Posted: 03-19-2008 01:42 pm
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Jon Plowe
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I fixed mine with a small metal strip and a couple of small pop rivets. Whatever way you do it the main problem is that most cures will not allow (without breaking again) the unit to be tightend up enough to stop it rotating on the steering column. A fix for this as a bit of fine emery paper folded so its rough on both sides placed inbetween the unit and the column giving some grip and so less pressure on your fix. Replacement  units are hard to get hold of even in the uk.

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 Posted: 03-19-2008 04:54 pm
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Brett Gibson JH5 20497
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If memory serves me correctly, Bruce Madden in Atlanta will take your old one and repair it, he also fix's the original rocker switch's as well, along with water pumps, he did the last two items for me and they have lasted (knock wood) better that 5 years so far.

Brett

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 Posted: 03-20-2008 11:35 pm
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StabnSteer
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Some excellent thoughts. I tried super glue but it wouldn't bond to the material well enough to allow it to grip and it snapped very easily. Epoxy was the same thing - which is why I'm astounded by this material since I can't get anything to really bond to it.

The hose clamps...maybe that would work with a lot of patience. I tried it for about 20 minutes, trying to find a way to get it to wrap around the right bits and after shorting out the electrical connections on the assembly a couple of times, decided it wasn't the best option. A hose clamp won't wrap all around the assembly since it is not one smooth ring so it would have to be at a weird angle.

And yep - I initially started with the duct tape! But, as anyone who tries this discovers, it eventually starts spinning again. :)

The break is at the bottom of the loop - so it is directly opposite the tightening mechanism. I'll have to look at it all a bit longer but I kind of like the metal/pop rivet idea. I might be able to make that work and that idea hadn't occurred to me.

'Twas 70 degrees out today, so I would love to get the car ready to go for its yearly inspection! Thanks for the ideas!

--Erik
Kansas City

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 Posted: 04-24-2008 11:37 pm
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Mitch Ware
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Well go figure, I now have the exact same problem with my car.

I've pulled out the switch assembly and will take it down to the shop tomorrow to see if I can come up with a solution.

Mitch Ware

#19670

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 Posted: 05-05-2008 09:56 pm
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Frank Schwartz
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I picked up some phenomanal cement at a model airplane show and exhibit. Expensive stuff, but a drop or two works.  I have glued some odd things back together that I never could before.  The seller was taking a rubber belt from a vacuum cleaner to demonstrate..he cut it in half and glued it back together and it was amazing. I will be glad to try it on any broken plastic parts..especially this one which is quite common and see if it works,  assuming someone wants to send it to me...no charge..but worth the effort.

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 Posted: 05-06-2008 01:44 am
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Dan (Florida)
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Worse come to worse I would waggle the broken one under the noses of the Local Brit car  club.  I seem to remember seeing a turn signal set on a Healey or mg or triumph  that looked pretty familiar. Mine broke a couple of years ago and I swapped with a Ca. Member  for various bits.  I guess I pitched the broken parts long ago.  I wouldn't give up on the low cost repair.  It's all a matter of engineering.  If there is an  old time brit car parts house  in your area take it to them, they might surprise you.

ps   come to think of it I saw it on a Lotus Elite not long ago that looked real close.

Dan

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 Posted: 05-06-2008 01:58 pm
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Mitch Ware
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The turn signal switch from a very late ('77-'80) MGB is almost exactly the same. The stalk is slightly shorter and the wires are pinned in different locations on the plug. I got mine from Moss (part# 141-850) for $79.95. All I had to do was pull the pins out of the plug and replace them in the same locations as the stock switch.

 

Mitch Ware http://home.nycap.rr.com/mware/

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 Posted: 09-20-2009 02:57 am
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mikebfoy
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I fixed a broken compression collar for the signal and wiper levers using a portion of a hose clamp. It is better than new and not difficult to do. I simply drilled 2 holes and used 2 flush head 4-40 screws and nuts to hold in a portion of a hose clamp. I cut out a section of the hose clamp to replace the side of the compression clamp that broke off. I created a counter bore so that the flush head screws became recessed and did not interfere with the steering column. I also used a hammer to sink the screw head into the holes I drilled into the clamp as well. It took about 30 min and the result is rock solid.

Attachment: clamp fix.jpg (Downloaded 128 times)

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 Posted: 09-20-2009 06:38 pm
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mikebfoy
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I forgot to mention, I recessed a portion of the plastic to receive one end of the hose clamp. I used a sharp blade and simply widdled it away.

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 Posted: 09-21-2009 06:51 pm
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Mike Aubuchon
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I repaired mine by connecting a short piece of 5/16" wide cable tie around the compression ring with three small flat head screws and nuts. I started by sanding a little off the broken end of the ring. This will leave a small gap at the pinch screw when reinstalling, allowing you to tighten as necessary. I set the loose end of the broken ring on the cable tie and drilled a small hole through the ring and the tie at the same time. I then carefully countersunk the hole on the inside of the ring just deep enough to receive the screw head. I inserted a screw through the ring and tie then tightened them with a nut. I repeated this for a second hole in the loose end of the ring. Next I cut the end of the tie to length so the loose part of the ring fit up to the main blinker assembly. I drilled and installed the third screw. I mounted the blinker to the steering shaft with the pinch screw and so far no problems.

Make sure you leave enough room for the pinch screw to clear the cable tie and the nut.

Hope this helps.

 

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