View single post by chuckcm14
 Posted: 02-14-2020 04:17 pm
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chuckcm14

 

Joined: 11-14-2019
Location: Lawsonville, North Carolina USA
Posts: 10
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Tim,
I first removed the exhaust cam housing and naturally gravity took over and three shims hit the floor. Three stayed inside the vale stem retainers and others stayed on the face of the cam followers. I measured the shims in the dimple and found that the difference is .0003 lower than across the face dimension of the shim. Does not seem like much wear. If I use the sims I will flip them over. The engine supposedly has less than 3k since rebuild. The engine ran real good and no smoke of any kind so I did not do a compression or leak down tests prior to checking valve clearance. My error.
It looked like black sealant was used for the cam housing to the head but it turned out to be a black gasket. I measured a crushed flat area on the gasket and it is .020 thick. Not sure what they did to end up with the valve clearances I measured.

I found a bigger problem. There is a rusty crud build up in the valley below the side of one head hold down nut. I believe there was a coolant leakage at onetime. The next head nut over has a small green coolant puddle in the valley. I will be pulling the intake cam housing and the head assy to replace the head gasket. I checked the toque on the head nuts and they were at the top end of the spec or greater. Not sure what caused the leak past the studs in the head.

Q1. When I install the shims is it ok to use an assembly lube on the sides (not faces) of the shims to hold them in place in the spring retainers during dry clearance trials

Q2. Is a new head gasket from Delta or others ok for the lotus 907 or is there a better gasket. Especially since the compression ratio was stated to me to be 9.5 to 1.

Q3. I want to check to see if a performance cams were really installed in the engine. Are there identifications to look for on the cams. I saw stamped on the cam non machined surface A 907E.

Q4. Is there a way to identify if high compression pistons were really installed.

Regards
Chuck